30 Jan

paris pillbox hat & cowl

Paris Pilbox & Cowl

Originally published as an exclusive design inside Issue #20 of Happily Hooked Magazine, the Paris Pillbox Hat & Cowl is now also available directly from La Visch Designs! The hat in this set is in the pillbox shape reminiscent of the Forties and Fifties of the previous century. A most stylish way of keeping your head warm! To complete the set there is also a matching cowl.

The Paris Pillbox Hat and Cowl are worked from the top down and feature an eye-catching textured stitch pattern.

This pattern is written in American English crochet terminology.


Price: € 6,50 add to basket

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Size and finished measurements
Hat: Sizes S (M, L): 48.5 (58, 65) cm (19 (23 ¾, 26 ½) inches) circumference.
Cowl: Sizes S (M, L): 67 (84, 101) cm (26 (33, 40) inches) circumference and 20 cm (8 inches) high.

Difficulty
Techniques used consist of puff stitches, dc, dc increases, sc, bphdc and ch stitches. Because of this, the pattern is suitable for the intermediate crocheter.

Pattern details

  • Worked in the round
  • Gauge Hat: 14 sts / 11.4 rounds = 10 cm / 4 inches measured over dc in the crown of the hat.
  • Gauge Cowl: Gauge is not critical in this cowl design. For the sample cowl: 12.6 sts / 9 rounds = 10 cm (4 inches) in stitch pattern (after blocking).
  • Pattern language is English
  • Digital PDF has 4 pages (letter size)

Materials

  • Yarn: Garnstudio DROPS Alaska (100% wool; 69 m (75 yards) / 50 g) in red 01 in the following quantities:
    Hat: 94 (114, 135) m (103 (125, 148) yds) or 2 (2, 2) balls of yarn.
    Cowl: 175 (220, 265) m (190 (240, 285) yds) or 3 (4, 4) balls of yarn.
    Substitute for any aran weight yarn for a similar result.
  • Crochet hook Hat: 5 mm / US # H-8 (or size to get gauge).
  • Crochet hook Cowl: 6 mm / US # J-10.
  • Yarn needle
  • 1 removable stitch marker to indicate the end of rounds (optional)
30 Jan

tutorial: seed stitch crochet

Seed stitch crochet - a tutorial by La Visch DesignsIn this post I will show you how to crochet the “seed stitch”. In this stitch single crochet stitches are alternated with double crochet stitches (US crochet terminology!). This gives a really lovely and dense fabric, very suitable for projects like scarves, blankets and bags. Let me show you step by step how it is done.

Seed stitch step by step

1. Start with a loose chain, when working flat back and forth it doesn’t really matter if you start with an even or odd number of chain stitches. If you will however be working in the round, start with a multiple of 2 + 1 turning chain. In this example, I started with a chain of 12.

Seed stitch crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

 

2. Turn and make 1 single crochet in the second stitch from the hook. In this example, I made my stitch in the back of the chain, instead it can of course also be made in one of the other parts of the chain.

Seed stitch crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

3. Make 1 double crochet in the next stitch.

Seed stitch crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

4. Make one single crochet in the next stitch.

Seed stitch crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until the end of the row.

seed-stitch_5

6. In this example, I ended the previous row with a single crochet. The new row will therefore start with 2 turning chains, followed by a double crochet in the first . If your previous row ended with a double crochet, the new row would begin with 1 turning chain, followed by a single crochet in the first stitch.

Seed stitch crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

7. Work 1 single crochet in next stitch, or (if your previous stitch was a single crochet) 1 double crochet.

Seed stitch crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

8. Continue the row by alternating double crochet stitches with single crochet stitches. Please note, that you always crochet a double crochet in the single crochet of the previous row. Similarly, if the stitch of the previous row was a double crochet, you are making a single crochet into it.

Seed stitch crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

9. Repeat steps 6 to 8 until your piece has the desired size.

 

16 Jan

tutorial: crochet provisional cast on

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

A provisional cast on is a way to make it possible to “release” the initially cast on stitches and knit with them in the other direction of the piece. This can be very useful, for example when knitting a completely symmetrical stole. Most cast ons have a different look than the bind off, but when completely avoiding a visible cast on, both ends will have exactly the same bind off look.

I really like the crochet provisional cast on, because it is also very simple and can be undone quickly. Besides the yarn for your project, you will also need a length of (smooth) waste yarn in a contrasting color and a crochet hook.Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Crochet provisional cast-on step by step

1. Make slipknot with the waste yarn (pink in the example) and place it around the hook.

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

2. Get your knitting needle and put it on the piece of yarn as pictured and pull up a loop through the loop on the hook. This is actually pretty similar to crochet a slip stitch around the knitting needle.

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

3. Wrap the yarn around the knitting needle again and make another slip stitch around the needle.

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

 

4. Repeat this until you have made the desired number of stitches (loops) on the knitting needle.

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

5. Next, crochet a small chain of about five stitches, break the yarn and pull the yarn tail through the last stitch.

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Now you can start your knitting project with the good yarn, using the temporary stitches on the needle. In the example after the temporary set-up I started with a small swatch of green.

Undoing the crochet provisional cast-on

The whole idea of a provisional cast on is of course that this is a temporary cast on. In the next couple of steps I will show you how to undo the cast on and free up the stitches for further knitting.

6. The side where you have created the crocheted chain, is the beginning. Loosen the yarn tail again and gently pull out the stitches of the chain.

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

7. Once a stitch of the project itself is released, catch it with your knitting needle. Note: In this example, I catch the stitches from the wrong side of the work from bottom to top. This releases the stitches in such a manner that their orientation on the needle will be twisted. If you catch the stitches from top to bottom instead, the orientation of the stitches will be as usual.

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

8. Pull for each stitch the waste yarn a bit more out of the work.

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

9. The last stitch might look like a weird half kind of stitch. Count your stitches to be sure that you have the correct number.

Now you can continue knitting on this side of the piece! Take care to see whether the stitches are positioned normal or twisted:

Making a crochet provisional cast-on - a tutorial by La Visch DesignsLeft in this picture is the regular orientation, on the right, there is a twisted stitch on the needle. This is no problem though: Just knit (or purl) the twisted stitch through the back loop to untwist the stitch mount.

16 Jan

wide horizon boatneck tee

Wide Horizon Boatneck Tee

The Wide Horizon Boatneck Tee is a striking top is an oversized, drapey boatneck tee that boasts a playful stripe pattern, decorative outside seams and slit shoulder detail that makes this tee a perfect garment for a breezy summer day. The simple construction makes it suitable for crocheters of all levels and provides a versatile and easy to wear garment.

This pattern is written in American English crochet terminology.


Price: € 7,10 add to basket

Create your own Ebook! Purchase any 4 patterns and receive the 5th one for free. No code necessary, just put 5 patterns in your cart and the price of the lowest priced pattern will be automatically deducted from the total.

Sizing
This pattern includes 5 sizes: S (M, L, XL, XXL) to fit bust size 86.4 (96.5, 106.7, 116.8, 127) cm or 34 (38, 42, 46, 50) inches.
The intended fit is with approx. 10 to 11.5 cm (4 to 4.5 inches) of positive ease at the bust. Sample shown is in size M.

Difficulty
Techniques used include sc, fhdc and hdc through the front loop as well as slip stitches. This pattern is suitable for crocheters of all levels.

Pattern details

  • This design is worked flat
  • Gauge: 17.2 sts and 11.9 rows = 10 cm / 4 inches in hdc fl after wet blocking.
  • Pattern language is English
  • Digital PDF has 3 pages (A4 size)

Yarn
Drops Cotton Light [50% cotton, 50% polyester; 105 m (115 yds) per 50 gram skein] in the following colors and quantities:
C1 – #14 Turquoise: 272 (330, 356, 412, 436) m or 297 (361, 389, 451, 477) yds.
C2 – #02 White: 352 (367, 444, 453, 530) m or 385 (401, 486, 495, 580) yds.
C3 – #08 Ice Blue: 272 (330, 356, 412, 436) m or 297 (361, 389, 451, 477) yds.

Substitute sport to DK weight cotton yarn for a similar result.

Materials

  • Size 4 mm (G-6) crochet hook.
  • Yarn needle.
13 Dec

tutorial – Solomon’s knot aka lover’s knot

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

In this post, I want to introduce you to a very lovely crochet stitch: The Solomon’s knot stitch. This particular crochet stitch is also known as the “Lovers Knot.” This stitch is ideal for scarves and shawls with an open and airy structure.

The Solomon’s knot stitch gives a beautiful result when worked in a very thin yarn as well as when it is made in a thicker yarn. And because the stitch is very “airy”, it also gives very quick results. Perfect for when you need a last minute present!

Do not be put off by the many steps, this stitch is easier than it seems!

Solomon’s knot step by step

In this example I used a relatively thick acrylic yarn, to be able to show you well how to work it. However, as said, the result is also very nice when using a very thin and light fluffy yarn like a kid-silk type yarn. These instructions are written in American English crochet terminology.

Row 1

1. Crochet 2 chains.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

2. Make a single crochet in the first stitch of the chain. Insert your hook under both loops of this first stitch.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

3. Make the loop on the hook bigger, with this it is important to maintain a constant size. I used my finger to assist with this. Next, make a yarn over and loosely pull up a loop through the enlarged loop.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

4. Insert the hook from front to back through the enlarged loop you just created. Yarn over and pull up a loop through the first loop on the hook. You now have two loops on your hook.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

5. Again make a yarn over and pull through both loops on the needle. You have now created one elongated loop.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

6. Repeat steps 2 to 5 for a multiple of 2 + 3 times. When starting with Step 2, insert the hook in the single crochet (the “knot”) that has been made last. In this example, I repeated steps 2 to 5 for a total of 7 times.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Row 2

7. Turn piece, skip the first four knots, insert the needle in the middle of the next knot (the fifth from the hook) and make 1 single crochet.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

8. Make 2 elongated loops by working steps 3 to 5 as before, followed by steps 2 to 5 once more.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

9. Skip 1 knot, insert the hook in the middle of the next knot and make 1 single crochet.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

10. Repeat 8 and 9 until the end of the row, finish with 1 single crochet in the last knot.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Row 3

11. Make 2 elongated loops by working steps 3 to 5 as before, followed by steps 2 to 5 once more. Turn the piece.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

12. Make 1 single crochet in the next knot.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

13. Make 2 elongated loops by working steps 3 to 5 as before, followed by steps 2 to 5 once more. Skip 1 knot, insert the hook in the middle of the next knot and make 1 single crochet. Repeat this until the last knot of the previous row.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

14. Make 2 elongated loops by working steps 3 to 5.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

15. Then insert the hook into the knot of two rows below and make an extended loop. Then, make a yarn over and loosely pull up a loop through the enlarged loop. next, repeat steps 4 and 5.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Row 4

16. Make 2 elongated loops by working steps 3 to 5 as before, followed by steps 2 to 5 once more. Turn the piece.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

17. Skip 1 knot and crochet 1 single crochet in the next knot.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

18. Repeat steps 16 and 17 until the end of the row and finish the row with 1 single crochet in the last single crochet/knot.

Crochet the Solomon's knot - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Repeat rows 3 and 4 until your work has the desired height.

And this is how to work the Solomon’s knot stitch!

02 Dec

tutorial – stripes in crochet

Stripes in crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Making stripes is the most simple way to use colour in your project. This way you can give it that little bit extra. This works especially well with a simple stitch pattern, such as single crochet, half double crochet and double crochet. But what are the things to pay attention to when making stripes in crochet?

In this post, I will tell and show you some things with respect to striping technique in crochet.

Stripes in crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

 

Changing colours the tidy way

When you crochet your rows as usual and switch colours after completion of a row, you will see that a bit of the old colour appears in the new row. To prevent this, do the following:

1. Crochet to the very end of your row, but do not complete the very last stitch. In this example of hdc fabric, it means that I have three loops left on the hook and have not finished this last stitch by pulling the yarn through these stitches.

Stripes in crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

 

2. Next, pick up the yarn in your other colour and pull through the last loops to complete the stitch.

Stripes in crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

 

Stripes in crochet without breaking your yarn

Weaving in ends is something most people do not find pleasure in. Therefore, it is good to know that it is also possible to crochet stripes without breaking the yarn. To do this, you just let the yarn in the colour you are not using for that stripe alongside the edge of the work. This method works best with an even number of rows and using only two colours.

1. Work as usual until the end of your row, but do not complete the final stitch as described above. Pick up the other coloured yarn from the side of the work, where you left it. Finish the last stitch with the new colour. Make sure not to pull this thread too tight!

Stripes in crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

2. In the case of a wider stripe, you do not want your contrast colour yarn to form a long loop on the edge of your piece. To avoid this, do the following: Whenever both colours of yarn are on the same side of your work, you twist them. This “catches” the thread of contrasting colour behind that of the colour where you are currently working with.

Stripes in crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

 

3. When switching to another colour, do it the same way as described above under 1.

Stripes in crochet - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

And this is how to work stripes in crochet!

One last tip: Only crochet stripes without breaking the yarn if the stripes are not too wide. With wider stripes, it can be difficult to keep the tension of the thread running along on the side just right. Often it just gets too tight or too loose. The result in these cases is usually better if you indeed just break the yarn.

29 Nov

tutorial: contrast in color

Pijl a design by La Visch Designs

It seems so simple, but contrast in color really is a thing for colorwork projects: one combination of colors can very much differ from the other. One aspect of color theory in relation to knitting and crochet consists of the contrast of the colors chosen. You can go for big contrasts, or just for subtle differences if you so desire.

But how can you tell what kind of contrast you have with the yarns and colors chosen?

Luckily there is a very handy trick to determine whether a particular color combination has big contrast or only a little. To do so, just take a photo of the yarns together and make the picture black and white!

Take for example the yarns below, quite different from each other, don’t you think?

Contrast in color - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

The black and white version, however, tells a different tale!

It turns out that the light blue version combined with the lilac hardly differ in contrast. This means that when you combine both in a project, the colors won’t really “pop”. An excellent choice, if that is your intention. If on the contrary a lot of contrast is desired, the dark blue combined with the light blue or the lilac would be a far better choice.

Try finding the contrast in color out for yourself!

Want to try some simple colorwork yourself? Take a look at the Pijl hat (also pictured above) and the Bloem hat!

15 Nov

paris pillbox hat & cowl

Paris Pillbox Hat & Cowl by La Visch Designs

Happily Hooked Magazine Issue 20 is all about Vintage-Inspired Designs with Contemporary Flair. And both my Paris Pillbox Hat & Cowl are an exclusive feature!

The hat in this set is in the pillbox shape reminiscent of the Forties and Fifties of the previous century. A most stylish way of keeping your head warm! To complete the set there is also a matching cowl.

These designs are now also available directly through La Visch Designs.

 

11 Nov

asymmetrical wedge shawl

Asymmetrical Wedge Shawl by La Visch Designs

In the December 2015 issue of I Like Crochet the magic of the winter season is captured in sparkly new patterns to crochet your dream Christmas. For the “baby it’s warm inside” section in this issue, I have designed the Asymmetrical Wedge Shawl. Pictures courtesy of I like Crochet Magazine.

This pattern is now also available through La Visch Designs!

This wedge shawl has a distinct asymmetrical shape, setting it apart from more traditional crochet shawls. Make a fast, large and cozy shawl in an aran weight yarn as described here, or make it a scarf in a fingering weight yarn. Because this wedge shawl is worked in a single piece from the tip up, it can easily be made in any size you want.

Asymmetrical Wedge Shawl by La Visch Designs

Asymmetrical Wedge Shawl by La Visch Designs

01 Nov

making a braided join

Braided join tutorial by La Visch Designs

Earlier, in my blog about the Russian join, I’ve already shown you how my favorite way to attach a new ball of yarn works. But how do you join new yarn just as invisible and strong when you do not have a needle with you?

In that situation, I like to use the braided method where the old and new yarn are braided together. Just as with the Russian method this makes a very strong join, which remains in place even with slick yarns like satin and mercerized cotton. Also, after you have complete your project no ends are to be woven in, as these are already woven in when making the join.

A prerequisite for this method is that your yarn consists of at least two plies. Why is this important, you will see later in this blog. The braided join makes for a locally thicker thread, but this does not need to be a problem, because it is often not very visible.

The braided join step by step

In this example I have used two different colors of yarn to show you exactly how to work this type of join.

1. The two threads to join, the pink yarn comes from the project, the yellow-green is the new ball of yarn.

Braided join tutorial by La Visch Designs

2. In the “old” yarn loosen the plies over a length of approx. 10 cm (4 inch) and divide into two. Place the new yarn on top of it as shown in the photograph.

3. Hold the threads together at the top. I like to hold them between my forefinger and middle finger, but you can also use a paperclip or something similar.

Braided join tutorial by La Visch Designs

4. Braid the three pieces of yarn (two of the “old” and one of the new ball of wool) together to join them.

Braided join tutorial by La Visch Designs

5. Braid until you reach the end of the three threads, you have a braided portion of about 5 up to 7.5 cm (2 to 3 inch).

Braided join tutorial by La Visch Designs

And now you can continue knitting again. As you see in the picture below, there are three stitches in this sample in which both threads are visible. However, if you join the same color of yarn, the join would be hardly visible in the finished piece.

Braided join tutorial by La Visch Designs

The back of the work looks like in the photo below. The loose ends I usually leave until after washing and possibly blocking the work. Then it’s just a matter of (carefully!) cutting them off.

Braided join tutorial by La Visch Designs