11 Jun

beat the fug

Beat the Fug - by La Visch Designs

Beat the Fug is a crescent-shaped shawl worked from the top-down. Inspired by the “Free-Wrench” novel by Joseph R. Lallo and the yarn dyed to match by Third Vault Yarns, it perfectly catches the steampunk vibe so wonderfully described in the story.

The shawl starts with a garter stitch tab. The body contains special shaping, which helps to avoid the “bump” in the upper edge of the shawl, so often present in crescent shawl designs. The lace in the border is knit on both right side and wrong side rows. The instructions for the border of the shawl are provided both fully charted and written out.


Price: € 5,95 add to basket

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Difficulty level
The Beat the Fug shawl starts with a modified garter stitch tab. Stitches used include knit, purl, k2tog, p2tog, skp, a centered double decrease, yo and m1L and m1R increases. This pattern is suitable for the intermediate knitter.

Sizes and finished measurements
Size S (L) finished dimensions: Wingspan of 152 (175) cm (60 (69) inches) and a depth of 40 (50) cm (15 ¾ (19 ¾) inches), measured after blocking. The shawl shown is in size L.

Pattern details

  • Gauge: For the sample shawl measured after blocking: 19 sts / 23 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) in stockinette stitch. Gauge is not critical for this design, but a loose gauge is strongly advised.
  • Pattern languages included: English and Dutch (Dit patroon omvat zowel een Nederlandse als een Engelse versie)
  • Digital PDF has 6 pages (letter size)

Materials

  • Yarn: Third Vault Yarns Companion 4-ply (100% Sw Merino; 400 m (437 yds) / 100 g) in the following colors and amounts: C1: 140 (200) m (153 (219) yds) / 35 (50) g in The Windbreaker, and C2: 260 (400) m (284 (437) yds) / 65 (100) g in Well Fug!
  • Size 4 mm (US 6) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles
  • Yarn needle
  • 2 stitch markers to mark the center of the shawl
  • Stitch markers for the lace section (optional)
20 May

crops of harvest

Crops of Harvest - a design by La Visch Designs

Crops of Harvest is a stylish triangular shawl knit sideways. There is just something about the combination of striped garter stitch and lace that appeals to me. Lazy mindless knitting, together with lovely lace, makes it a perfect choice to combine a solid/tonal fingering weight yarn with a variegated one. What’s not to love?!

The pattern contains both fully written out as well as charted instructions for the lace. The lace section in the middle of the shawl is true lace knitting, worked on both wrong and right side rows.


Price: € 5,95 add to basket

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Difficulty level
The lace in the Crops of Harvest shawl pattern is worked on both RS and WS rows. Stitches used include knit, purl, yo, kfb, and both left- and right-leaning single and double decreases. This pattern is suitable for the intermediate knitter.

Sizes and finished measurements
One size (easily adjustable): Finished dimensions of the sample shawl: Span width of 210 cm (82 ¾ inches) along the upper edge and a depth of 81 cm (32 inches), measured after blocking.

Pattern details

  • Gauge: Gauge is not critical in this design. For the sample shawl measured after blocking: 16.5 sts / 27 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) over garter stitch stripes.
  • Pattern languages included: English and Dutch (Dit patroon omvat zowel een Nederlandse als een Engelse versie)
  • Digital PDF has 4 pages (letter size)

Materials

  • Yarn: A Guy With Two Needles Yarn Softy Squishy Fingering 2 (100% Merino; 399 m (436 yds) / 100 g) in the following colors and amounts: MC: 399 m (436 yds) / 100 g in “Overheated” and CC: 399 m (436 yds) / 100 g in “Bountiful wreath”. Substitute wool fingering weight yarn of comparable thickness, in a variegated (CC) and in a solid/tonal (MC) colorway for a similar result.
  • Size 4 mm (US 6) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles
  • Yarn needle
  • 1 stitch marker to indicate the edge stitches
22 Apr

crystal palace

Crystal Palace - a crochet design by La Visch Designs

The Crystal Palace scarf was inspired by the characteristic glass and cast iron facade of the building designed for the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London, with the same name. The pattern instructions produce a scarf in the size as pictured. However, the width and length are easy to adjust for further customization, including those following the usage of weights of yarn other than fingering-weight.

The instructions are both charted and written out, also, this pattern uses American English crochet terminology.


Price: € 5,95 add to basket

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Difficulty level
Stitches used in the Crystal Palace scarf pattern: chain, double crochet, treble crochet, triple treble crochet and slip stitches. This pattern is, therefore, suitable for the adventurous beginner.

Sizes and finished measurements
One size – measurements after blocking: 31 cm (12.2 inches) wide and 190 cm (74.8 inches) long, excluding fringe.

Pattern details

  • Gauge for the sample scarf measured after blocking:  10 sts and 4 rows in lace pattern = 6.4 cm (2.5 inches) wide and 11.8 cm (4.7 inches) tall.
  • Pattern languages included: English and Dutch (Dit patroon omvat zowel een Nederlandse als een Engelse versie)
  • Digital PDF has 4 pages (letter size)

Materials

  • Yarn: 230 m (248 yds) / 80 g Garnstudio DROPS Delight (75% wool, 25% nylon; 175 m / 191 yds per 50 g skein); in color Blue 03. Substitute any gradient fingering weight yarn for a similar result.
  • A size 3.5 mm (US E/4) crochet hook
  • Yarn needle
30 Mar

lace for mom in knotions magazine

Lace for Mom - a design by La Visch Designs

Lace for Mom - a design by La Visch Designs

The moment I showed my mom the yarn I used in this shawl, she said: “You know this is soooo my color?!” No problem mom, this one is for you. The delicate lace in Lace for Mom is based on traditional Estonian stitch patterns, which, of course, include nupps. My mom wouldn’t have it any different! Often, people find nupps a tad daunting. Don’t stress though, the pattern contains instructions for both traditional and easy nupps.

And the best part? You can find this pattern for free in the March 2018 issue of Knotions Magazine!

Lace for Mom - a design by La Visch Designs

Logo Knotions Magazine

28 Mar

tutorial – knitting the k2tog decrease

Knitting the k2tog decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

In my previous post, I showed you how to work the left-leaning skp decrease. In this one, I will tell you all about the matching right-leaning decrease, the one abbreviated with “k2tog”. This stands for “knit 2 stitches together”. It’s a very easy and very common way to reduce the number of stitches in your project and make it narrower.

Below you can find how to work this decrease, so get your materials and follow along! I’m starting with the same swatch I used in my previous tutorial on the m1bl increase.

Knitting the k2tog decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Knitting the right-leaning k2tog decrease step by step

1. First, take your project and work to the spot indicated in your pattern, where the decrease is supposed to be made. I’m making the decrease 3 stitches in, counted from the garter stitch edging on the left side of the swatch. However, because the decrease itself uses 2 stitches I have to stop to do the decrease 5 stitches from the left-side edging.

Knitting the k2tog decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

2. Next, insert the tip of the right-hand needle into the first 2 stitches at the same time as if to knit.

Knitting the k2tog decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

3. Wrap the yarn around the needle…

Knitting the k2tog decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

4. ..pull it through the stitches you inserted the right-hand needle in…

Knitting the k2tog decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

5. …and slip the original stitches of the left-hand needle.

Knitting the k2tog decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

And this is how to work the k2tog decrease! The result in stockinette is shown below. In this small swatch, there are three decrease rows worked every other row, at a distance of 2 stitches from the garter stitch edge.

Knitting the k2tog decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

21 Mar

tutorial – knitting the skp decrease

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

To make shaping in your knitting possible, knowing how to decrease the number of stitches on your needles is quite important. In this post, I’m going to show you how to work the left-leaning decrease that is abbreviated with “skp”. Skp stands for “slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over the knitted stitch”.

There are, of course, also other left-leaning decreases. Take for example the “slip slip knit” (ssk) decrease. And yes, the result is quite similar to that of the skp, but I find the latter personally much easier to work. That’s the reason I usually include the skp decrease in my patterns and add a note that instead, an ssk can be used if desired.

Below you can find how this decrease is worked, so get your materials and follow along! I’m starting with the same swatch I used in my previous tutorial on the m1bl increase.

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Knitting the left-leaning skp decrease step by step

1. First, take your project and work to the spot indicated in your pattern, where you want to make the decrease. In my case, that’s 3 stitches in from the garter stitch edging on the right side of the swatch.

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

2. Next, insert the tip of the right-hand needle into the first stitch as if to knit…. (It is, of course, possible to insert the needle as if to purl, but this will twist the stitch mount and will make the decrease look like a twisted stitch.).

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

3. … and slip it onto the right-hand needle without actually knitting it.

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

4. Next, we are going to knit the second stitch. To do so, we start with inserting the right-hand needle into the first stitch on the other needle as shown below.

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

5. Wrap the yarn around the needle…

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

6. ..pull it through the stitch you inserted the right-hand needle in…

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

7. …and slip the original stitch off the left-hand needle.

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

8. Next, insert the left-hand needle into the second stitch counted from the tip of the right-hand needle…

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

9. And pull it over the first stitch from the tip on the right-hand needle to complete the decrease. Do you see how it slants to the left?

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

And this is how to work the skp decrease! The result in stockinette is shown below. In this example, there are three decrease rows worked every other row, at a distance of 2 stitches from the garter stitch edge.

Knitting the skp decrease - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

The decreases in this particular swatch look a bit wibbly/wobbly but in my experience that mostly disappears after blocking. In lace, however, I don’t notice it at all after blocking.

07 Mar

olijf

Olijf - a shawl pattern by La Visch Designs

Snuggle up in cozy woolens when it’s cold! This super bulky weight shawl makes you feel like you’re enveloped in a nice warm big hug. It knits up quickly, with its stockinette edge sections and lace section in the center. What’s not to like?! Not a fan of super bulky? Make Olijf in lighter weight yarns, instructions included!

Written and charted instructions for the lace are included. Directions for the central lace section and plain stockinette / increase section are written separately and must be read together to work each row.


Price: € 5,95 add to basket

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Difficulty level
The Olijf shawl starts with a garter stitch tab. Stitches used include knit, purl, yo, k2tog, skp, make 1 with a backward loop as well as knitting tbl. This pattern is suitable for the intermediate knitter.

Sizes and finished measurements
One size: Wingspan of 187 cm (73 ½ inches) and a depth of 80 cm (31 ½ inches), measured after blocking. Adjust the sizing by using a different weight yarn and/or working a different number of repeats of the body pattern or the border. This will, of course, change the amount of yarn needed.

Pattern details

  • Gauge: Approx. 6 sts / 10 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) over stockinette, measured after blocking.
  • Pattern languages included: English and Dutch (Dit patroon omvat zowel een Nederlandse als een Engelse versie)
  • Digital PDF has 6 pages (letter size)

Materials

  • Yarn: 400 m (437 yds) Debbie Bliss Roma (70% Merino, 30% Alpaca; 80 m (87 yds) / 100 g). Get this yarn on LoveKnitting (affiliate link). Substitute any super bulky weight wool yarn for a similar result. Can’t find super bulky weight yarn? Try triple stranding DK or worsted weight wool yarn.
  • Size 10 mm (US 15) / 100 cm (40 inches) circular needles
  • Yarn needle
  • 2 stitch markers to indicate the center section
04 Mar

tutorial – knitting the m1bl increase

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

As you know, there are many options to work increases in knitting. Take for example the various m1 increases. A disadvantage of the regular m1 increase is, however, that it’s worked into the horizontal strand between two stitches in the row below. This causes the knitting to become tighter when they’re stacked over multiples rows. Especially when working in stripes or garter stitch, this can cause the lines to become distorted.

And that is where the m1bl increase comes in. The m1bl increase is also known as “Make 1 with Backward Loop” or the “Backward loop increase”. And when worked correctly it’s almost invisible! This is due to the fact that it doesn’t use yarn from the row below, but is given its own amount to be formed. Also, the m1bl increase can be used to either increase mid-row or cast-on stitches at the end of the row. The m1bl is basically the same as the thumb method of casting on, also known as the “single cast-on”, “e-wrap cast-on” or the “backward loop cast-on”.

Directional increase

The m1bl increase is a directional increase. This means there is both a left-leaning and a right-leaning version, which mirror each other when used together. This can be very useful in projects where paired increased are needed and it may be visually pleasing to be symmetrical. Think for example of both sides of a top-down triangle shawls spine, or bust shaping in a garment.

Sometimes there is no indication of a direction given in the pattern, usually denoted by plain “m1bl”. If that is the case, you can choose which version you like best, or easiest to make. Often I don’t bother using both versions of the m1bl increase. I mean, it’s so invisible on its own!

In my patterns you can find the following description for the m1bl increase:
Make 1 with a backward loop (m1bl): With your thumb, make a backward loop with the working yarn over the right-hand needle and pull to tighten.

Below you can find how this increase is worked.

Knitting the left-leaning m1bl increase step by step

1. Take your working yarn and loop it as shown in the picture below, with the yarn going to the project in front.

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

2. Next, insert the tip of the right needle from back to front through the loop.

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

3. Pull the yarn snugly around the needle.

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

4. On next row when you come to the loop added, purl (as shown here for stockinette) or knit (for garter stitch) as usual.

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

Knitting the right-leaning m1bl increase step by step

1. Take your working yarn and loop it as shown in the picture below, with the yarn going to the project in the back.

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

2. Next, insert the tip of the right needle from front to back through the loop.

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

3. Pull the yarn snugly around the needle.

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

4. On next row when you come to the loop added, purl (as shown here for stockinette) or knit (for garter stitch) as usual.

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

The results

And this is how knitting both right- and left-leaning versions of the m1bl increase are worked! The result in stockinette is shown below, with the right-leaning version on the right of the swatch and the left-leaning one on the left. In this small swatch, there are three increase rows worked every other row, at a distance of 3 stitches from the garter stitch edge.

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

As you can see in the below picture, the increases are fairly invisible in reverse stockinette. The same holds true in garter stitch!

Knitting the m1bl increase - by La Visch Designs

21 Feb

tutorial – making a slipknot

making a slipknot - by La Visch Designs

I know, it seems so basic: making a slipknot to start casting on your knitting project. But that’s only because once you know how to do it, it’s easy! And yes, I know it’s possible to start casting on without a slipknot, and that it’s sometimes to be preferred because it doesn’t give that extra knot on your cast-on edge. But that’s not the point here.

Most of the times I still start my knitting projects with a slipknot, even though I know how to do it without. I guess I just like that sturdy start of my cast-on edge! In this post, I’m going to show you how to do make a slipknot around a knitting needle yourself.

Making a slipknot step-by-step

1. Loop the yarn as shown in the picture below.

Making a slipknot - by La Visch Designs

2. Next, arrange the yarn tail in such a way, that you can pull it through the first loop, like this:

Making a slipknot - by La Visch Designs

3. Insert your knitting needle as shown, underneath the arranged bit of yarn tail.

Making a slipknot - by La Visch Designs

4. Now hold both the yarn tail and the yarn going back to the ball of yarn and pull them both to tighten the slipknot around the needle.

Making a slipknot - by La Visch Designs

5. And there you have it: a lovely slipknot around your needle! You’re now ready to start casting on the remaining stitches needed for your project. You can for example use the knitted-on cast-on for this.

Making a slipknot - by La Visch Designs

Of course, it can be hard to visualize the motions needed to realize the above. For that very reason, I’ve also made a short video in which I show you how I make slipknots around my knitting needle. It doesn’t contain a spoken commentary, it’s really only to show you the motions!

14 Feb

art deco

Art Deco - by La Visch Designs

Art Deco is a crescent-shaped shawl worked from the top-down. The stylized flowers as commonly used in France, in the early days of Art Deco, inspired the flowers in the border of this design.

The shawl starts with a garter stitch tab. The body contains special shaping, which helps to avoid the “bump” in the upper edge of the shawl, so often present in crescent shawl designs. The lace in the border is knit on both right side and wrong side rows. The instructions for the border of the shawl are provided both fully charted and written out.


Price: € 5,95 add to basket

Create your own Ebook! Purchase any 4 patterns and receive the 5th one for free. No code necessary, just put 5 patterns in your cart and the price of the lowest priced pattern will be automatically deducted from the total.


Difficulty level
The Art Deco shawl starts with a garter stitch tab. Stitches used include knit, purl, k2tog, p2tog, p2tog tbl, skp, yo and m1L and m1R increases. This pattern is suitable for the intermediate knitter.

Sizes and finished measurements
One size: Finished dimensions of the sample shawl: 191 cm (75 ¼ inches) along the upper edge and a depth of 58 cm (22 ¾ inches), measured after blocking.

Pattern details

  • Gauge: Approx. 15 sts / 18 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) over stockinette, measured after blocking. While gauge is not critical in this design, a loose gauge gives the best result.
  • Pattern languages included: English and Dutch (Dit patroon omvat zowel een Nederlandse als een Engelse versie)
  • Digital PDF has 6 pages (letter size)

Materials

  • Yarn: Brooklyn Tweed Loft (100% Targhee-Columbia; 251 m (275 yds) / 50 g) in the following colors and amounts:
    MC: 251 m (275 yds) / 50 g in Faded Quilt
    CC: 502 m (550 yds) / 100 g in Camper
  • Size 4 mm (US 6) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles
  • Yarn needle
  • 2 stitch markers to indicate the center stitches
  • Stitch markers for the lace section (optional)