cherry blossom stole in tinyStudio Creative Life magazine

Cherry Blossoms Stole by La Visch Designs

I’ve got some exciting news for you: my Cherry Blossom Stole pattern makes an appearance in issue 11 of tinyStudio Creative Life magazine! I can tell you it’s a very special edition. Not only does it have over 120 pages of articles on spinning, weaving, knitting & crochet, it’s also available in both digital and print format!

I don’t know if you’re familiar with it, so I’ll just tell you. It’s a quarterly digital publication, with rich content like embedded videos, and slidable galleries of eye candy. It focuses on mindfulness, freedom from stress and clutter, and a conscious approach to fiber crafts. tinyStudio Creative Life is not just a magazine for spinners and fiber artists. There is also the tinyStudio TV video podcast. This gives hands on demonstrations of techniques, interviews with contributors, etc. to enrich and enhance the content of each issue. Below you can find the table of contents of this issue:

The underlying theme of this issue is naturally beautiful. Editor Suzy Brown has left this deliberately quite open, because it is a subject that could have many different interpretations. And indeed, throughout this issue you will see many naturally beautiful things. We all see beauty
in our own unique ways and find our own expressions of the inspiration it brings us by using our own voices.

Cherry Blossoms Stole by La Visch Designs

To get your copy of this issue of tinyStudio Creative Life, visit this link. Not sure yet whether you’d like it? Visit this page to download the free anniversary issue of tinyStudio magazine, and see all the rich content each and every issue provides.

strawberry finch

Strawberry Finch shawl

The gorgeous color of this kid silk yarn reminded me of the wonderfully bright plumage of the Strawberry Finch, a cute little bird found throughout Asia. What better way to show it off this gorgeous yarn than with all-over lace? Of course, this shawl can also be knit in fingering-weight yarn.

The Strawberry Finch shawl is knitted in lace patterning from the top-down in one piece, starting at the neck edge with a garter tab. The instructions are provided charted and written out.


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Difficulty level

Patterning in the body of the shawl is on both RS and WS rows. Stitches used include knit, purl, yo, k2tog, skp, purl 1 below, bunny ears yo, and a centered double decrease. This pattern is therefor suitable for the intermediate to advanced knitter.

Sizes and finished measurements

Finished dimensions of the sample shawl: span width of 180 cm (71 inches) along the upper edge and a depth of 78 cm (30 ¾ inches), measured after blocking.

Change the size of the shawl by using heavier or lighter weight yarn and/or working fewer (or more) repeats of the body, the border, or both. This will, of course, change the amount of yarn needed.

Pattern details

  • Strawberry Finch is written for a gauge of approx. 11.1 sts / 19.4 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) over body pattern, measured after blocking. Gauge is however not critical in this design.
  • Pattern languages included: English.
  • Digital PDF has 5 pages (letter size)

Yarn

420 m (459 yds) / 50 g WayfaringYarns Sophia (72% brushed superkid mohair, 28% mulberry silk; 420 m (459 yds) / 50 g) in the color “Fuschia”.

This yarn and pattern are also available as a kit from Sweater Sisters!

Substitute any mohair type yarn with a halo of a similar lace weight for a similar result. Of course, this design can also be worked in a regular fingering weight yarn.

Materials

  • Size 5 mm (US 6) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles were used for the sample shawl. If using fingering weight yarn with less halo, needles in size 4 mm (US 6) are suggested.
  • 4 stitch markers to indicate the center and edge stitches.
  • Stitch markers to indicate repeats of the lace patterning (optional).
  • Yarn needle.

tutorial – preventing the hump in a top-down crescent

Preventing the hump in top-down crescents

Crescent or sickle-shaped scarves/shawls are very popular and rightly so: because of their special shape, they stay better draped over the shoulders than traditional triangular scarves. I have designed and made several, take for example Art-Deco and Sunglow Forest as shown below.

The one thing that these shawls haven’t, is a well-know issue with this shawl shape: The Dreaded Hump.

Crescent shaped shawl with hump

In this tutorial I’ll show you how to construct a crescent-shaped shawl, without this “hump”.

Top-down crescent shawl construction

Before we go into details, it’s good to get clear what particular construction method I’m using. There are various ways to construct a crescent-shaped shawl. Some are worked from the bottom-up, some from the top-down, some with short rows and some without.

Here, in this tutorial I focus on the top-down construction in which increases are worked on both right side and wrong side rows. The stitch count is increased by 4 stitches at the edges on right-side rows and by 2 on wrong-side rows.

In order to know how to prevent the hump, we first must know why it appears in the first place. Take a look at the picture below:

Regular top-down crescent - including tension arrows

The fast increase ratio, located at the edges only, creates tension in the piece and pushes the fabric into a “hump” at the center edge. In other words: The increases at the outer edges, force the edges outwards. However, the bottom edge of the work only has so much give, ultimately pushing the center upwards creating a hump.

The solution to prevent the hump

The solution: creating more slack in the bottom edge of the shawl, to prevent the tension from pushing the work upwards! Like this:

Adjusted top-down crescent, including tension arrows

The secret: Strategically placing increases in the center of the shawl to create a pie-shaped wedge.

This gives enough extra fabric at the bottom edge of the work to prevent the hump from occurring! The type of increase is completely up to your own preference. In this example, a yarn over is used to make it very visible, in the Art Deco shawl the more discreet m1L and m1R increases are used. In a (reverse) stockinette fabric, extra increases once every 8 rows would do the trick.

Garter stitch has quite a different row gauge than stockinette does. The precise ratio of garter stitch to stockinette, however, depends greatly on the yarn used, and personal gauge. Perhaps the phase of the moon as well. Some sources say that the ratio of garter stitch to stockinette is 1:2. Others say it’s 3:5, 4:6 or even closer to a 5:7 ratio. Taking the latter as an example, this means that (for example) for every 26 rows per 10 cm/4 inches in stockinette there are 36 rows per 10 cm/4 inches in garter stitch when worked with the same yarn and needles. To know your exact ratio and thus the exact repeat for working a pie shaping row in garter stitch, swatching would be needed.

Based on the various possible ratios of garter stitch to stockinette, extra increases every 12 to 16 rows would do the trick in a garter stitch based fabric.

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Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.

blocking a triangle shawl

Blocking a triangle shawl

The top-down triangle must be the shawl shape I knit most often. So, it would be good to share with you how I go about blocking this type of triangle shawl. In this tutorial, I will be showing you how I blocked my Strawberry Finch. This one has all-over lace patterning, pulled into points at the bottom edge into points during blocking. In the below picture you can this shawl before blocking.

starwberry Finch shawl before blocking

What is blocking?

Before we go into details, it’s good to get clear what I mean exactly with “blocking”. Blocking is nothing more than shaping your knit or crochet pieces when moist or wet. Think of finished items or components to sew together afterwards. By blocking them, you can not only even out stitches, but also bring the item to the intended dimensions. The latter of course within reason!

For a sweater or sweater components blocking usually is nothing more than washing the item(s) and patting them gently into shape. Lace shawls, on the other hand, benefit from a rather vigorous blocking by pinning it stretched out as much as possible. After the piece has dried, it will hold its shape until the next washing.

Please note, that not all fibers are suited for the magic of blocking. Only natural fibers like wool, alpaca, cotton etc. as well as some viscose fibers can be blocked in the sense that the dimensions can be adjusted. On synthetics, like acrylic, the process of wet-blocking as described in this post has virtually no effect at all, besides evening out the stitches. Acrylics can be blocked (“killed”) by applying heat through steam blocking or ironing, but that’s an entirely different process.

Blocking an asymmetrical shawl - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

Materials needed

Since the subject of this post is the blocking of a lace triangle shawl, I go for a vigorous blocking using pins. I use the following materials:

  • Blocking mats, these are usually foam mats that hold pins well. Think for example of insulation mats, mats for yoga or play tiles for children.
  • Pins, I use regular pins, but other folks sometimes prefer stainless steel T pins.
  • Wool wash.
  • A towel large enough to comfortably hold your project.

Preparations

Before we can start with the actual blocking, we have to do some preparations. These mainly consist of giving your shawl a wash, since the FO must be a tad moist for the best blocking results. For completenes’s sake below how I go about it. If you’d like pictures of these steps, please visit the tutorial on blocking an asymmetrical shawl.

  1. First I fill the sink with some lukewarm to warm water and add a dash of wool wash. Put the shawl into the water and let it rest for about 10-15 minutes to make sure the fabric is completely saturated with water.
  2. Next, rinse the shawl. Don’t use cold water for this, as “shocking” warm wool may cause it to felt. If your yarn bleeds dye a bit, you can add a splash of vinegar to the rinse water to help fix it. After rinsing, gently squeeze excess water out of your project. Don’t wring it! This may damage the fibers, causing breakage.
  3. Spread out your towel and place the shawl on top of half of it. Fold the second half of the towel over your shawl and roll it up like a sausage. Squeeze the roll well to transfer most of the wetness from the shawl to the towel. With bigger projects, I find it helps to actually stand a bit on it.

Also, prepare your blocking mats by laying them down in the shape and size needed for your project. I prefer to do that in my workroom because it can be closed off against “helping” cats.

Blocking a triangle shawl step by step

Time to get started with the actual blocking!

  1. Spread out your project on the blocking mats.

    Take care to do so in roughly the shape you want to block it in.Blocking a triangle shawl - step 1

  2. Start by pinning the 2 outer corners.

    You can stretch the upper edge of the shawl out for this, but don’t stretch it to the max., we still need some slack in the fabric to accommodate stretching it out in other directions.Blocking a triangle shawl - step 2

  3. Next, pin the entire upper edge of the shawl in a smooth curve, using approx. 1 pin every 1.25 – 2.5 cm (0.5 – 1 inch).

    You can, of course, pin the upper edge in a straight line, but I find a slightly curved edge sits better on the neck and shoulders.Blocking a triangle shawl - step 3

  4. Now pull down the bottom point and pin it to the mats.

    Again, don’t stretch it to the max yet!Blocking a triangle shawl - step 4

  5. Now pull a point on both the left and the right side down and pin them to the mats.

    At this point, you can still keep some slack in the fabric of the shawl. Also, note that I pinned through the point of a leaf, but that I skipped one on either side.Blocking a triangle shawl - step 5

  6. Move up 2 leaves and again pin them down symmetrically.

    At this point you can ignore any tension differences, we will get to that later on.Blocking a triangle shawl - step 6

  7. Continue as in step 5 and 6 until the whole bottom edge is pinned to the mats.

    At this point I saw it, do you see it too?Blocking a triangle shawl - step 7

  8. A hole in my shawl!

    I must have caught the halo of the yarn there, instead of the thread itself. The tension of the blocking made it go poof. It happens…. Don’t stress, just catch the stitches with a safety pin. The shawl can be fixed after it’s dry.What you don't want to see during blocking...

  9. Back to pinning the bottom edge.

    Now I’m pinning the points I skipped previously, adjusting the pins already there where needed, to achieve a smooth curve.Blocking a triangle shawl - step 8

  10. The final step in blocking.

    Finally, I go over the entire bottom edge again, making sure to pull it out to the max and keeping the edge in a smooth curve. I needed some weights to keep the mats in place, and keep them from buckling under the tension I’m putting the shawl under.Blocking a triangle shawl - step 9

And the result is a beautifully blocked Strawberry Finch shawl! This how to go about blocking a triangle shawl.

Strawberry Finch shawl after blocking

And that hole?

I took a bit of extra yarn and did some duplicate stitch over a couple of stitches on the side of the hole. Then I caught the stitches in a manner very similar to how it should have been. The yarn ends I hid in those wavy decrease lines. Close up, you can see they’re a tad heavier than the other ones. But it’s quite invisible if you don’t know it’s there. Yay!

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Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.

green jasper

Green Jasper shawl

Green Jasper captures all the gorgeous variations found in the semi-precious gemstone. This design is knit sideways on the bias, making a shallow and asymmetrical triangle, perfect for wearing as an elegant scarf. The combination of garter stitch in a variegated hand-dyed yarn and simple lace in a solid/tonal yarn makes it a perfect choice to get the best of both worlds.

The pattern contains both fully written out and charted instructions for the lace section.


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Difficulty level

Stitches used include knit, purl, yo, k2tog, skp, kfb and pfb. This pattern is therefor suitable for the intermediate knitter.

Sizes and finished measurements

Finished dimensions of the sample shawl: 192 cm (75 ½ inches) along the upper edge and a depth of 69 cm (27 inches), measured after blocking.

Make the shawl larger by adding more repeats of the garter stitch and/or by working more repeats in the lace section. This will, of course, increase the amount of yarn needed.

Pattern details

  • Green Jasper is written for a gauge of approx. 16 sts / 23 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) over garter stitch, measured after blocking. Gauge is however not critical in this design.
  • Pattern languages included: English.
  • Digital PDF has 4 pages (letter size)

Yarn

  • C1: 1 skein Sticks & Cups Olympus (100% Bluefaced Leicester; 400 m (437 yds) / 100 g) in “Quebrada de Humahuaca”.
  • C2: 1 ball ONION Knit Nettle Sock (70% wool, 30% cellulose; 185 m (202 yds) / 50 g) in 1006 “Green”.

Substitute any variegated fingering weight yarn for C1 and any solid or tonal colored fingering weight yarn for C2 for a similar result.

Materials

  • Size 4 mm (US 6) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles were used for the sample shawl.
  • Removable stitch marker to denote the RS of the shawl (optional)
  • Stitch markers to indicate repeats of the lace patterning (optional)
  • Yarn needle

tutorial – working a pfb

Tutorial - Working a pfb

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There are lots of ways to increase the number of stitches on your needle. Purling in the front and back of the same stitch, also known as the pfb increase, is the purl side version of the kfb increase. In other words: you work the pfb on the purl side of the fabric, which is often the wrong side) to get an extra stitch that looks like the kfb increase on the knit- or right side of stockinette fabric. This increase can be a bit tricky to work at first, but once you know how to do it, you will breeze right through them.

The pfb increase is also known as a “bar increase” because it forms a little horizontal bar in your work. Due to this little bar, this increase is virtually invisible in garter stitch. When used in stockinette, as shown in this tutorial, it forms a series of decorative bars along the increase line when viewed from the knit side of the fabric. This how-to will give you step-by-step instructions on how to work the “purl front and back” increase.

Materials used

Yarn: * Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, a good value, good quality 100% acrylic yarn, here in the color 128 Lime Green.

Needles: * KnitPro Zing Fixed Circular Needles. In this tutorial, I used the 4 mm (US 6) size with a cable length of 80 cm (32 inches).

Working a pfb step-by-step

In this tutorial I’ll continue the swatch that I used in previous tutorials on increases and decreases.

  1. First, work your way across the row until you’ve reached the point where you want to make the increase.

    In this case, I want the increase 2 sts in from the garter stitch border on the right. A pfb first makes a purl stitch, followed by the extra “bar” stitch on the left of it. Because of this, I start working the pfb over the third stitch.Working a pfb - step 1

  2. To start, insert the right-hand needle purl wise into the front loop of the stitch.

    To finish this part of the stitch, wrap your yarn around the needle, and pull it through the stitch. Don’t drop it of the needle yet!Working a pfb - step 2

  3. Now we insert the right-hand needle purl wise into the back loop of the stitch.

    To do so, insert the needle from the left to the right through the back loop. This is the tricky part, I find it helps to pull the fabric down a bit as shown in the picture, because it makes it easier to see where to insert the needle.Working a pfb - step 3

  4. Next, wrap the yarn around the needle and pull it through the stitch.

    To complete the pfb stitch, drop the loop from the original stitch off the left-hand needle.Working a pfb - step 4

  5. This is how it looks now.

    Do you see the purl stitch with an extra “bar stitch” to the left of it?Working a pfb - step 5

  6. This is how it looks after some more rows with increases, when viewed from the purl side of the fabric.

    In this swatch, I’ve also made increases on the left side of the fabric. Very invisible here!Working a pfb - the result on the purl side

  7. And here is the view from the knit side of the fabric.

    When viewed from this side, it really looks like a kfb, right?!Working a pfb - The result on the knit side

And that’s all there is to it!

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Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.

tutorial – changing a skp to a k2tog

Tutorial changing skp to k2tog - by La Visch Designs

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This tutorial is part of the series on fixing mistakes in knitting. When knitting lace or shaping in garments it can easily happen that a left-leaning decrease is worked where a right-leaning one was needed. Or vice versa, of course. And because I really don’t like ripping out my work, I’m showing how to drop down several rows in your knitting and how to go about changing skp to k2tog.

Materials used

Yarn: * Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, a good value, good quality 100% acrylic yarn, here in the color 142 Tea Rose.

A crochet hook in the same size or slightly smaller than your knitting needles. For example this * Pony Aluminum Crochet Hook in size 4 mm.

Changing a skp to a k2tog step by step

  1. First, slip the stitches purl-wise from the left-hand needle to the right-hand needle, until you reach the stitch directly above the wrongly worked decrease.
    Do you see it, 4 stitches below the needle?

    Changing skp to k2tog - step 1

  2. Now drop down the stitch.

    Ladder it all the way down until the decrease is undone, and you have 2 stitches instead of 1.Changing skp to k2tog - step 2

  3. Catch these 2 stitches with the crochet hook.

    Make sure to insert the hook from left to right through the stitches.Changing skp to k2tog - step 3

  4. Next, it’s time to start working the k2tog decrease.

    To do so, insert the crochet hook below the first horizontal thread running directly above the 2 stitches on the hook.Changing skp to k2tog - step 4

  5. Next, pull the horizontal thread through the both stitches on the hook.
    This completes the k2tog decrease. In the picture below you can see that the decrease now leans to the right instead of to the left as it was originally.

    Changing skp to k2tog - step 5

  6. Finishing up.

    Next, ladder your way up again by inserting the crochet hook underneath the horizontal thread directly above the hook, and pulling the thread through the loop already on the hook to make a new knit stitch. For stockinette, repeat this until all horizontal threads have been worked. After this you can place the stitch back unto the knitting needle.Changing skp to k2tog - the result

And that is how you go about changing a skp to a k2tog, several rows down in your knitting! I prefer knitting skp instead of ssk for my left leaning decreases, but the same principles apply to that too:

  1. Just drop down the stitch directly above the decrease
  2. Catch the stitches
  3. Work the correct decrease using the first horizontal thread above the stitches as your working yarn
  4. Ladder your way back up again.

That’s all there is to it!

Patreon logo

Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.

octaaf

Octaaf - a shawl design by La Visch Designs

Octaaf is a stylish triangular shawl knit sideways, with all-over lace patterning. I named it after the verse form consisting of eight lines of poetry. While I made my version in a DK weight yarn, it’s very easy to customize to other weights and quantities of yarn. Just knit in pattern until your shawl has the desired size, or when you run out of yarn!

The pattern contains both fully written out as well as charted instructions for the lace.


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Skills required

Stitches used include knit, purl, skp, k2tog, a centered double decrease, yo, and kfb. This pattern is suitable for the intermediate knitter.

Sizes and measurements

Finished dimensions of the sample shawl: Span width of 201 cm (79 inches) along the upper edge and a depth of 88 cm (34 ½ inches), measured after blocking.

The size of the Octaaf shawl can be changed by using lighter or heavier yarn and/or working less (or more) repeats of the body patterning. This will, of course, change the amount of yarn needed.

Pattern details

  • Worked flat and sideways.
  • Written for a gauge of 12 sts / 20 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) over body pattern measured after blocking. However, gauge is not critical in this design.
  • Pattern language: English.
  • Digital PDF has 4 pages (letter size)

Yarn

Manos del Uruguay Silk Blend (70% Merino, 30% Silk; 137 m (150 yds) / 50 g) in the following colors and amounts:

  • C1: 137 m (150 yds) / 50 g in “Mallard”
  • C2: 137 m (150 yds) / 50 g in “Steel”
  • C3: 274 m (300 yds) / 100 g in “Virgo”

Substitute single ply type wool or wool/silk DK weight yarn of comparable thickness in a solid or tonal color for a similar result.

Materials

  • Size 4.5 mm (US 7) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles. Choose a needle size appropriate for the yarn selected.
  • Yarn needle.
  • Stitch markers to indicate repeats of the lace patterning (optional).

tutorial – fixing a forgotten m1

Fixing a forgotten m1 increase - a tutorial by La Visch Designs

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In an earlier tutorial I already showed you how to fix a forgotten yo. But, of course, that’s not the only type of increase that can be forgotten. What about fixing a forgotten m1? Personally, I have a very big aversion against ripping out my work, just because I forgot one teeny tiny stitch a couple of rows back. I mean, it certainly is an option, but I consider it to be more of a last resort type of option.

So, in this post I’ll show you to fix a forgotten m1 increase, specifically for the situation that the lack of the increase hasn’t been noticed until several more rows or rounds have been worked. I’ll address it for both the m1l and m1r variations of the increase.

Materials used

Yarn: Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, a good value, good quality 100% acrylic yarn, here in the color 142 Tea Rose.

A crochet hook in the same size or slightly smaller than your knitting needles. For example this Pony Aluminum Crochet Hook in size 4 mm.

Fixing a forgotten m1 step by step

Let’s get started! In this tutorial I’m using the swatch I also used in previous tutorials on fixing things in knitting.

  1. First, go to the spot in your knitting where the m1 increase should have been.

    Let’s assume we’ve forgotten to work the increase at the spot indicated by the crochet hook. If you look carefully, you can see horizontal threads between the 2 columns of stitches.Fixing a forgotten m1 - step 1

  2. Let’s assume we’ve forgotten the m1 increase 4 rows down.

    Now insert the crochet hook from top to bottom underneath the 5th horizontal thread.Fixing a forgotten m1 - step 2

  3. Next, twist the crochet hook 180 degrees to twist the loop on the hook.

    The direction depends on the type of m1 increase you want to make. Twist it 180 degrees clockwise for a left leaning increase (m1l), or 180 degrees counterclockwise for a right leaning (m1r) increase. In the picture below the loop has been twisted, see how it sits more snugly on the crochet hook?Fixing a forgotten m1 - step 3

  4. Now we can ladder the work back up!

    To do so, insert the crochet hook underneath the horizontal thread directly above the new m1 (the 4th horizontal thread down), and pull the thread through the loop already on the hook to make a new knit stitch. Repeat this (for stockinette) as often as needed until you’ve run out of threads to pull through and place the stitch on the left-hand needle. Below you can see the result.Fixing a forgotten m1 - step 4

Now you’re ready to continue your knitting!

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Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.

tutorial – working a double crochet bind-off

Working a double crochet bind-off

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In this tutorial I’ll show you how to work a double crochet bind-off. As you know, there are many ways to bind off knitted fabric, which one to choose depends greatly on various factors. Take the amount of stretch in the bind-off itself, for example. The Russian bind-off is wonderful for lace shawls that are blocked to the max, but is less suitable for projects that need more structure at the bind-off edge. For that an i-cord bind-off may be more suitable. Another thing to take into account is the way it looks, does it match the cast-on used?

The double crochet bind-off is reasonably flexible and, due to its taller height when compared with other bind-offs, a pretty good match with the German twisted cast-on. Let’s take a look at how it’s worked!

Materials used

Yarn: * Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, a good value, good quality 100% acrylic yarn. Pictured here in the color 155 Vintage Pink.

Needles: * KnitPro Zing Fixed Circular Needles. In this tutorial, I used the 4 mm (US 6) size with a cable length of 80 cm (32 inches).

A crochet hook in the same size or slightly smaller than your knitting needles. For example this * Pony Aluminum Crochet Hook in size 4 mm.

Working a double crochet bind-off step by step

Working a double crochet bind-off - 1

  1. First, insert your crochet hook into the first stitch on the needle knit wise.

    Working a double crochet bind-off - 2

  2. Next, wrap the yarn around the hook….

    Working a double crochet bind-off - 3

  3. …and pull it through the stitch on the needle.

    Working a double crochet bind-off - 4

  4. Next, remove the stitch and let it drop from the needle.

    Working a double crochet bind-off - 5

  5. Repeat steps 1-4 once.

    Now you have 2 loops on your crochet hook.Working a double crochet bind-off - 6

  6. Now wrap your yarn around the crochet hook…

    This is the start of the “double crochet” part of this bind-off.Working a double crochet bind-off - 7

  7. …and pull the wrapped yarn through both loops that are on the hook.

    Working a double crochet bind-off - 8

  8. Repeat steps 5 to 7 until all stitches are bound off.

    This is how it looks:Working a double crochet bind-off - the result

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Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.