tutorial – working the Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on

Tutorial - Working the Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a commission if you purchase something through these links. I’ve indicated these links with an *.

You may have heard of the Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on method; it’s a variation of the long tail cast-on that is somewhat stretchier. The extra stretch is because of a few extra steps and an extra twist when making it. This, in turn, makes it much better suited for things like top-down socks, and cuffs of mittens and gloves.

And, like the long tail cast-on, it has the challenge of guesstimating the current length for your yarn tail. If you run out of tail, there are no more stitches that can be cast on. Since this cast-on requires a tad more yarn than the regular long tail cast-on, I would suggest leaving a yarn tail that is 4 to 5 times instead of 3 to 4 times as long as the width you want your work to become.

Let’s go ahead and see how this cast-on is done!

Materials used

Yarn: * Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, a good value, good quality 100% acrylic yarn, here in the color 155 Vintage Pink.

Needles: * KnitPro Zing Fixed Circular Needles. In this tutorial, I used the 4 mm (US 6) size with a cable length of 80 cm (32 inches).

Working the Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step by step

Let’s get started on working this Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on!

  1. Start by making a slip knot.

    Place the slip knot on the right-hand needle.Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 1

  2. Next, place your left thumb and index finger between the strands as shown while you hold the ends of both strands of yarn in your left hand with your other fingers.

    This is the same as for a regular long tail cast-on.Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 2

  3. Now rotate your left-hand upwards, while moving your right hand down, to dip the tip of the needle underneath both strands of yarn you see going around the thumb.

    In other words: move the tip of the needle from left to right underneath both strands of yarn.Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 3

  4. Next, move the needle tip over the strand at the right (top) and down into the loop at the thumb.

    Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 4

  5. In this step you see how it looks after I’ve pulled the needle tip down into the loop and rotated my thumb upwards a bit.

    Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 5

  6. When moving the needle tip upwards again it looks like this.

    See how the yarn around the thumb is now twisted into an “x” shape?Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 6

  7. Next, bring the needle over the top of the strand of yarn going around your index finger, and dip below it from right to left.

    Now we’ve caught this strand too, it’s time for the next step.Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 7

  8. Now we pull the last caught strand through the “thumb loop”, specifically through the gap of the x closest to your right hand.

    Bending your thumb a bit can help to open up the x to more easily see where the needle tip should go.Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 8

  9. This is how it looks after the strand has been pulled through.

    Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 9

  10. To finish the new stitch, gently draw out your thumb from the loop …

    Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 10

  11. … and tighten the stitch a bit by pulling on the strands.

    Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on step 11

  12. Repeat steps 2 to 11 as often as needed to arrive at the desired number of stitches.

    This is my result working the Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on:Old Norwegian or Twisted German cast-on: the result

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tutorial – working the long tail cast-on

Tutorial - Working the long tail cast-on

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a commission if you purchase something through these links. I’ve indicated these links with an *.

The long tail cast-on method is one that is often used, because of the neat edge it makes. Also, it’s both firm and slightly elastic, making it quite suitable for a range of projects. It can be a bit tricky to get the hang of, but once you get the hang of it, it’s pretty fast to work.

The main challenge with this cast-on is that it uses its yarn tail together with the working yarn. In other words: if you don’t leave the tail long enough you may run short of yarn to cast-on all needed stitches. This is especially bothersome when casting on many stitches. A rule of thumb is to leave a yarn tail that is 3 to 4 times as long as the width you want your work to become. A somewhat more reliable guesstimate can be made by casting on 10 stitches, unravel those and leave a yarn tail in that length, multiplied as many times as needed to arrive at the number of required stitches. Plus a bit extra, of course, to weave in later on.

Another way to deal with it is not to calculate or guess anything, but just use 2 different strands of yarn. This can be from 2 different balls of yarn, or both ends of the same ball if you can find the end in the center.

Shall we go see how the cast-on is worked?

Materials used

Yarn: * Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, a good value, good quality 100% acrylic yarn, here in the color Marine.

Needles: * KnitPro Zing Fixed Circular Needles. In this tutorial, I used the 4 mm (US 6) size with a cable length of 80 cm (32 inches).

Working the long tail cast-on step by step

Let’s get started on this long tail cast-on!

  1. Start by making a slip knot.

    Place the slip knot on the right-hand needle.Long tail cast-on step 1

  2. Next, place your left thumb and index finger between the strands as shown while you hold the ends of both strands of yarn in your left hand with your other fingers.

    Just try it, it’s really less tricky than it sounds!Long tail cast-on step 2

  3. In this next picture I’ve rotated my left-hand upwards, while moving my right hand down.

    Doing this, the yarn basically makes a “v” between my thumb and index finger, making it possible to dip the tip of the needle underneath the strand of yarn you see going around my thumb.Long tail cast-on step 3

  4. Here I’ve caught that strand by passing the needle under the yarn that goes around my thumb.

    Long tail cast-on step 4

  5. Next, bring the needle over the top of the strand of yarn going around your index finger, and dip below it from right to left.

    Now we’ve caught this strand too, it’s time for the next step.Long tail cast-on step 5

  6. Now we pull the last caught strand through the “thumb loop”.

    This picture shows this step pretty well.Long tail cast-on step 6

  7. To finish the new stitch, gently draw out your thumb from the loop …

    Long tail cast-on step 7

  8. … and tighten the stitch a bit by pulling on the strands.

    Long tail cast-on step 8

  9. Repeat steps 2 to 8 as often as needed to arrive at the desired number of stitches.

    This is my result working the long tail cast-on:Long tail cast-on: the result

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rosy does it

Rosy Does It - a shawl design by La Visch Designs

Sometimes a little bit of pink is all that’s needed to bring a bit of joy to your day. In this case, Rosy Does It. This design combines stunning lace with easy garter stitch stripes. And while I made my version in three colors, you can, of course, also make it in only two or even one color. This design is also very flexible in sizing, making it very easy to adjust to your preferences; what’s not to love?!

Rosy Does It is a triangle shawl worked from the top-down in one piece, starting at the neck with a garter stitch tab. Written and charted instructions are included for the lace body of the shawl.


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Skills required

Knit the Rosy Does It shawl from the top-down, starting with a garter tab cast-on. Patterning in the body of the shawl is on both RS and WS rows, and contains simple cables. Stitches used include knit, purl, k2tog, skp, yo, purl 1 below, bunny ears yo, and a centered double decrease. This pattern is suitable for the intermediate to advanced knitter.

Sizes and measurements

One size – finished dimensions: 185 cm (73 inches) along the upper edge and a depth of 81.5 cm (32 inches), measured after blocking.

Change the size of the shawl by using heavier or lighter weight yarn and/or working fewer (or more) repeats of the body patterning or the garter stitch edging. This will, of course, change the amount of yarn needed.

Pattern details

  • Worked flat from the top down.
  • Written for a gauge of 11 sts / 28 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) over garter stitch stripes measured after blocking. However, gauge is not critical in this design.
  • Pattern language: English.
  • Digital PDF has 4 pages (letter size)

Materials

  • Yarn: Nuna by Mirasol Yarn (40% merino, 40% silk, 20% rayon from bamboo; 175 m (191 yds) / 50 g). Substitute any plied wool/silk blend fingering or sport weight yarn for a similar result. In the sample shawl:
    • C1: 175 m (191 yds) / 50 g in Coral 1046
    • C2: 175 m (191 yds) / 50 g in Sangria 1042
    • C3: 175 m (191 yds) / 50 g in Warm gray 1002
  • Size 4 mm (US 6) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles. Choose a needle size appropriate for the yarn selected.
  • Yarn needle.
  • Cable needle.
  • 4 stitch markers to indicate the center and edge stitches.
  • Stitch markers to indicate repeats in the lace patterning (optional).

tutorial – working a purl 1 below (p1b)

Tutorial on working a purl 1 below (p1b)

There are cases in which skipping the row on your needle for particular stitches is desired, and one is to knit or purl in the row below that one. In other words: you knit/purl into the stitch below where you normally would, exactly as the name suggests. Think, for example, off Fisherman’s Rib, but also off the bunny ears yo stitch, on its following wrong-side row.

The challenge in working this stitch is recognizing the stitch to insert your needle in. So that’s what I’ll be showing you in this tutorial. I’ll be using the same project I also used for the bunny ears yo tutorial, so please don’t be alarmed by all the lace. The p1b stitch in itself does not involve any lace knitting. To show you the difference between using a regular purl and a p1b stitch in bunny ear yo lace, take a look below:

See how they differ? In the one on the left there is a horizontal thread over the yo part of the stitch. In the picture on the right the new stitch is made catching that horizontal thread too and thus keeping the yarn over open!

Materials used

Yarn: Nuna by Mirasol Yarn (40% merino, 40% silk, 20% rayon from bamboo; 175 m (191 yds) / 50 g), here in the color 1046 Coral.

Needles: To be honest, I don’t recall what the brand is of the needles I used in this tutorial. I do know I used the 4 mm (US 6) size with a cable length of 80 cm (32 inches).

Working a p1b step by step

In patterns, you may encounter the following description of this stitch:
Purl 1 below (p1b): Purl into the stitch 1 row below the one on the needle by inserting the needle from back to front. Purl this stitch, then pull the worked stitch and the stitch above off the needle together.
But how to actually do this? Read on!

  1. First, work your way across the row until you’ve reached the point where you want to make the stitch.

    See that first stitch on the left-hand needle? That’s the yo in the middle of the bey stitch where I’ll be making the p1b stitch.P1b step 1

  2. Insert the right-hand needle purl wise

    Normally, you’d insert the needle directly into the loop that’s on the left-hand needle. However, in this case we want to insert the needle into the stitch below that one.P1b step 2

  3. Now wrap your working yarn around the needle and pull it through.

    See that you’re actually pulling it through 2 stitches at once? That is, the one on the needle and the one directly below it. To finish the stitch just slip the top stitch off the left-hand needle without actually working it. Because the fabric is secured by purling into the stitch below it, the stitch won’t run down unraveling.P1b step 3

  4. The below picture shows how it looks on the purl side of the fabric after I’ve worked a regular purl stitch in the 3rd and last stitch of the bey.

    You can see the 2 strands that are caught by the p1b pretty well.P1b, the result on the purl side

  5. Turning the fabric around, this is how it looks on the right (knit) side of the fabric.

    I really like how it looks!P1b, the result on the right (knit) side

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tutorial – working the bunny ears yo stitch

tutorial - working the bunny ears yo stitch

In this tutorial I’m going to show you a stitch that I’m using in a new design: the bunny ears yarn over stitch, or “bey” for short. It uses a bunny ears decrease combined with a yarn over. Now, you may wonder what a bunny ears decrease is. I’ll tell you! It’s a symmetrical way of decreasing 3 stitches to only 2! I’ll be making a tutorial on this decrease and it’s variations soon.

Back to the bunny ears yo stitch. In this stitch a yarn over is placed between both parts of the decrease, essentially negating the decrease. Adding the yo in between both parts of the decrease make it look like 2 directional decreases on both sides of a yo, but without actually increasing or decreasing anything. The result is a very pretty stitch that does wonderfully in lace patterning as pictured here. Let’s get started with how to actually work this stitch!

Materials used

Yarn: Nuna by Mirasol Yarn (40% merino, 40% silk, 20% rayon from bamboo; 175 m (191 yds) / 50 g), here in the color 1046 Coral.

Needles: To be honest, I don’t recall what the brand is of the needles I used in this tutorial. I do know I used the 4 mm (US 6) size with a cable length of 80 cm (32 inches).

Working the bunny ears yo stitch step by step

In patterns, you may encounter the following description of this stitch:
Bunny ears yo (bey): Knit 2 stitches together but leave the second stitch on the left needle, yo, next work skp over the next 2 stitches.
But how to actually do this? Read on!

  1. First, work your way across the row until you’ve reached the point where you want to make the stitch.

    See those 3 stitches on the left-hand needle? That’s where I’ll be making the bey stitch.Bunny ears yo stitch - step 1

  2. Next, insert the tip of the right-hand needle into the first 2 stitches at the same time as if to knit.

    Over these stitches, we’ll be doing the first steps of a k2tog.Bunny ears yo - step 2

  3. Wrap the yarn around the needle…

    Bunny ears yo stitch - step 3

  4. … and pull the yarn through the 2 stitches.

    Bunny ears yo stitch - step 4

  5. Next, slide only 1 of the 2 original stitches of the left-hand needle.

    With a regular k2tog, both stitches would be moved off the needle. So this is where it starts to go different.Bunny ears yo stitch - step 5

  6. Next, wrap the yarn around the needle.

    This is where we make the “yarn over” part of the stitch.Bunny ears yo stitch - step 6

  7. Now we’re starting the left leaning decrease part of the stitch.

    This we’ll be working on the 2 remaining stitches on the left-hand needle: 1 stitch we haven’t handled yet, and 1 stitch that we didn’t move off the needle when working the k2tog right-leaning decrease. This part of the stitch can be worked both as ssk and skp, but since I personally prefer skp I’ll be showing this in the tutorial.

    To start insert the tip of the right-hand needle into the first stitch as if to knit …Bunny ears yo stitch - step 7

  8. … and slip it onto the right-hand needle without actually knitting it.

    This is how it then looks:Bunny ears yo stitch - step 8

  9. Next, we are going to knit the second stitch.

    To do so, we start with inserting the right-hand needle into the first stitch on the other needle as shown below.Bunny ears yo stitch - step 9

  10. Wrap the yarn around the needle…

    Bunny ears yo stitch - step 10

  11. . …pull it through the stitch you inserted the right-hand needle in…

    Bunny ears yo stitch - step 11

  12. …and slip the original stitch off the left-hand needle.

    Bunny ears yo stitch - step 12

  13. Next, insert the left-hand needle into the second stitch counted from the tip of the right-hand needle…

    Bunny ears yo stitch - step 13

  14. … after that, pull it over the first stitch from the tip of the right-hand needle to complete the decrease.

    Do you see how it slants to the left? With this the bunny ears yarn over stitch itself is finished. But, for optimal results, we’re not done yet. Take a look at the next section to see why.Bunny ears yo stitch - step 14

Working the WS row after the bey row

After working a row where bunny ear yo’s are worked there, of course, also follows a wrong side purl row. However, when working regular purl stitches over the bey stitches, this creates a horizontal thread over the yo part of the stitch. This is, of course, no problem if you like how this looks. You can see this below on the left. But, if you prefer the bey stitch to really look like a big yo, flanked by directional decreases, we really have to do something different from a regular purl stitch. The solution is working a purl 1 below or p1b instead. This gives the result as shown on the right:

Please note that the picture on the left was right at the beginning of my project, in the set-up section. The other one was further on in the body of the project, hence the difference in surrounding fabric.

A tutorial for the purl 1 below or p1b will follow soon!

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Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.

tutorial – working a p2tog tbl

Tutorial on working the p2tog tbl decrease

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a commission if you purchase something through these links. I’ve indicated these links with an *.

Last time I showed you how to do a decrease worked on the wrong side of the fabric, that looks like a k2tog right leaning decrease on the right side: p2tog. In this tutorial it’s time to focus on the left leaning equivalent. In other words: a decrease worked on the wrong side, that looks like a skp or ssk left leaning decrease on the right side of the fabric. This is the “purl 2 stitches together through the back loop” decrease, or “p2tog tbl” for short.

Below I’ll show you how to work this decrease step by step.

Materials

Yarn: * Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, a good value, good quality 100% acrylic yarn, here in the color 128 Lime Green.

Needles: * KnitPro Zing Fixed Circular Needles. In this tutorial, I used the 4 mm (US 6) size with a cable length of 80 cm (32 inches).

Working a p2tog tbl step by step

  1. Work your way across the row until you’ve reached the point where you want to make the decrease

    In this case, I want to work the decrease 4 stitches in from the left side of the swatch.Working a p2tog tbl - step 1

  2. Pull down the fabric below the 2 stitches you’ll be working the decrease on

    This will make it easier to both see where to insert the needle and to actually insert it.Working a p2tog tbl - step 2

  3. Insert the needle

    Now insert the needle from left to right through the back loop of the first two stitches on the left-hand needle.Working a p2tog tbl - step 3

  4. Wrap the working yarn around the right-hand needle …

    Working a p2tog tbl - step 4

  5. … and pull the yarn through the two stitches

    Working a p2tog tbl - step 5

  6. To finish the decrease slip the two stitches worked of the needle.

    This is how this then looks.Working a p2tog tbl - step 6

  7. The result

    When viewed from the right side of the fabric, this decrease looks exactly look a skp!Working a p2tog tbl - step 7

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Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.

keten

Keten stole - by La Visch Designs

Keten is a simple stole, featuring mosaic slip stitch patterning. The combination with garter stitch makes it a perfect choice for both mindless relaxing and somewhat more challenging knitting. Don’t let the color work frighten you though; if you can knit stripes, you can do this! Keten is available in 2 sizes: a scarf and a wrap; pictured is the largest size.

The pattern contains fully written out instructions as well as charts for slip stitch sections.


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Skills required

This pattern features mosaic slip stitch patterning. Stitches used include knit, and slipping stitches. This pattern is suitable for the advanced beginner or intermediate knitter.

Sizes and measurements

Size S (L): 37.5 (51) cm (14 ¾ (20) inches) wide and 172.5 cm (77 inches) long, measured after blocking.

The size of this stole can easily be changed by casting on a different number of stitches and by adjusting the number of repeats worked in the various sections. This will, of course, impact the amount of yarn needed.

Pattern details

  • Worked flat
  • Written for a gauge of 18 sts / 18 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) over garter stitch, measured after blocking.
  • Pattern languages included: English and Dutch (Dit patroon omvat zowel een Nederlandse als een Engelse versie)
  • Digital PDF has 4 pages (letter size)

Yarn

Fleece Artist BFL Sport (100% Bluefaced Leicester wool; 330 m (361 yds) / 125 g) in the following amounts and colors:

  • C1: 152 (322) m (166 (352) yds) / 58 (122) g in Coral.
  • C2: 127 (269) m (139 (294) yds) / 48 (102) g in Granite.

This yarn and the Keten stole pattern are also available as a kit from Sweater Sisters! 

Substitute any wool sport weight yarn in colors with sufficient contrast for a similar result. Please note that this yarn grew upon washing and blocking the finished item. Substituting a different yarn may result in a smaller sized scarf or stole.

Materials

  • Size 4 mm (US 6) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles – for garter stitch sections.
  • Size 4.5 mm (US 7) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles (or larger as needed) – for mosaic sections, to minimize “pulling in”.
  • Yarn needle.
  • Stitch markers to separate repeats of the mosaic patterning (optional)

tutorial – working a p2tog

Tutorial on working a p2tog

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a commission if you purchase something through these links. I’ve indicated these links with an *.

In a previous post, I already showed you how to work the right-leaning decrease, in which 2 stitches are reduced to one: the one abbreviated with “k2tog”. This stands for “knit 2 stitches together”. It’s a very easy and very common way to reduce the number of stitches in your project and make it narrower. It’s also often used in lace knitting.

But what when your lace also requires decreases to be worked on the wrong side of the fabric? This is where the purled decrease p2tog comes in! This decrease is worked on the wrong side and looks just like a k2tog when the result is viewed on the right side of the fabric. It’s a pretty straight-forward decrease to work; purl 2 stitches together, to decrease the total number of stitches by one. It is just like making a regular purl stitch but you work through two stitches instead of one.

Below you can find how to work this decrease step by step, so get your materials and follow along!

Materials

Yarn: * Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, a good value, good quality 100% acrylic yarn, here in the color 128 Lime Green.

Needles: * KnitPro Zing Fixed Circular Needles. In this tutorial, I used the 4 mm (US 6) size with a cable length of 80 cm (32 inches).

Working a p2tog step by step

  1. Work your way across the row until you’ve reached the point where you want to make the decrease.

    In this case, I want to work the decrease 4 stitches in from the right side of the swatch.Working a p2tog - step 1

  2. Insert the needle

    Now insert the needle purl wise through the first two stitches on the left-hand needle and wrap the working yarn around the right-hand needle.Working a p2tog - step 2

  3. Pull the yarn through the two stitches…

    Working a p2tog - step 3

  4. … and slip the two stitches worked of the needle to complete the decrease

    Working a p2tog - step 4

  5. The result

    When viewed from the right side of the fabric, this decrease looks exactly look a k2tog!Working a p2tog - the result

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Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.

tutorial – changing a k2tog to a skp

Tutorial changing a k2tog to a skp by La Visch Designs

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means that at no extra cost to you, I may receive a commission if you purchase something through these links. I’ve indicated these links with an *.

This tutorial is part of the series on fixing mistakes in knitting. When knitting lace or shaping in garments it can easily happen that a left-leaning decrease is worked where a right-leaning one was needed. Or vice versa, of course. And because I really don’t like ripping out my work, I’m showing how to drop down several rows in your knitting and change a k2tog to a skp.

Materials used

Yarn: * Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, a good value, good quality 100% acrylic yarn, here in the color 142 Tea Rose.

A crochet hook in the same size or slightly smaller than your knitting needles. For example this * Pony Aluminum Crochet Hook in size 4 mm.

Changing a k2tog to a skp step by step

  1. First, slip the stitches purl-wise from the left-hand needle to the right-hand needle, until you reach the stitch directly above the wrongly worked decrease.
    Do you see it, 4 stitches below the needle?

    Changing a k2tog to a skp - step 1

  2. Drop down the stitch.

    Ladder it all the way down until the decrease is undone and you have 2 stitches instead of 1. Catch these 2 stitches with the crochet hook, from right to left.Changing a k2tog to a skp - step 2

  3. Starting the skp decrease

    To do so, insert the crochet hook below the first horizontal thread running directly above the 2 stitches on the hook.Changing a k2tog to a skp - step 3

  4. Next, pull the horizontal thread through the first stitch on the hook.
    This completes the “knit” part of the “slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over” sequence that makes up a skp.

    Changing a k2tog to a skp - step 4

  5. Completing the skp

    To finish the left leaning decrease, we now pull the second loop on the crochet over the first one.Changing a k2tog to a skp - step 5

  6. Finishing up

    Next, ladder your way up again by inserting the crochet hook underneath the horizontal thread directly above the hook, and pulling the thread through the loop already on the hook to make a new knit stitch. Repeat this until all horizontal threads have been worked. After this you can place the stitch back unto the knitting needle.Changing a k2tog to a skp - done!

And that is how you go about changing a k2tog to a skp, several rows down in your knitting! I prefer knitting skp instead of ssk for my left leaning decreases, but the same principles apply to that too:

  1. Just drop down the stitch directly above the decrease
  2. Catch the stitches
  3. Work the correct decrease using the first horizontal thread above the stitches as your working yarn
  4. Ladder your way back up again.

That’s all there is to it!

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Thanks to my Patreon supporters for bringing you this freebie! Creating quality patterns and tutorials is a lot of work and resource-intensive. However, I find it important to give you free content like this tutorial. Thanks to the generous support of my Patreon supporters I can make it happen. Thank you, patrons! Click here to join, or click here to read more about La Visch Designs on Patreon.

whiskey on the rocks

Whiskey on the Rocks shawl by La Visch Designs

Sometimes all that’s needed is a little scarf to show off that wonderful single skein of fingering weight yarn. Combine it with easy to remember shaping and easily adjusted sizing, and we have a definite winner! It doesn’t hurt either that the loopy i-cord bind off is perfect for using up odds and ends.

Whiskey on the Rocks is an asymmetrical triangle or “boomerang” shawl worked sideways on the bias in one piece. The instructions for the body with the eyelet patterning are provided both charted and written out.


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Skills required

Whiskey on the Rocks is a boomerang shaped shawl knit sideways, and includes an i-cord based bind off. Stitches used include knit, purl, k2tog, k4tog, yo, and make 1 with a backward loop. This pattern is suitable for the intermediate knitter.

Sizes and measurements

One size – finished dimensions: 186 cm (73 ¼ inches) along the upper edge and a depth of 60 cm (23 ½ inches), measured after blocking.

Change the size of the shawl by using heavier or lighter weight yarn and/or working fewer (or more) repeats of the body. This will, of course, change the amount of yarn needed.

Pattern details

  • Worked sideways on the bias
  • Written for a gauge of 15 sts / 20 rows = 10 cm (4 inches) over body patterning, measured after blocking.
  • Pattern languages included: English and Dutch (Dit patroon omvat zowel een Nederlandse als een Engelse versie)
  • Digital PDF has 4 pages (letter size)

Materials

  • Yarn:
    • MC: 384 m (420 yds) / 100 g Tosh Merino Light by Madeline Tosh (100% merino; 384 m (420 yds) / 100 g) in “Whiskey barrel”.
    • CC: 56 m (61 yds) / 15 g ONION knit Nettle Sock (70% wool, 30% cellulose; 185 m (202 yds) / 50 g) in Oker.
    • Substitute any single-ply type fingering weight yarn for the MC and any solid colored yarn for the CC for a similar result.
  • Size 4 mm (US 6) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles for the body of the shawl.
  • Size 3.5 mm (US 4) / 80 cm (32 inches) circular needles for the i-cord bind off.
  • Yarn needle.
  • Stitch markers (optional, for use between repeats of the lace patterning).